Thursday, December 3, 2015

Fake LinkedIn profiles used by hackers

BBC TECHNOLOGY

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growing number of hackers are targeting professionals on LinkedIn, according to security firm Symantec. Its investigation uncovered dozens of fake accounts on the social network, across a variety of industries.

Posing as recruiters, the fake accounts allow hackers to map the networks of business professionals and gain the trust of those in them.

The security firm has worked with LinkedIn to remove all of the fake accounts it identified.

Click here for detail

Monday, November 30, 2015

Short Answers to Hard Questions About Climate Change

By Justin Gillis.NYTimes

1. How much is the planet heating up?

1.7 degrees is actually a significant amount.

As of this October, the Earth had warmed by about 1.7 degrees Fahrenheit since 1880, when tracking began at a global scale. That figure includes the surface of the ocean. The warming is greater over land, and greater still in the Arctic and parts of Antarctica. Read More

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Li-Fi Probably Won’t Be The New Wi-Fi For Most People

By Nitish Kulkarni.Techcrunch

Long restricted to the academic domain, Li-Fi, a light-based data delivery method is suddenly getting all sorts of attention. An Estonian startup Velmenni recently tested an commercial implementation and found it to be superior to Wi-Fi in almost every way – except as something you and I will probably ever use.

Velmenni’s technology, called Jungru, uses an LED bulb and transmits data at gigabit speed. It has a theoretical speed of 224 gigabytes per second, the BBC reported. While the Jungru product is commercially viable, it is still based on what seems to be a laboratory-grade MATLAB and Simulink setup paired with photodiodes as opposed to a final product which must transmit data in real world environments Detail

Atmospheric Scientist Ken Caldeira Argues That the Paris Climate Talks Won’t Go Far Enough | MIT Technology Review

By Ken Caldeira MIT Technology Review

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any years ago, I protested at the gates of a nuclear power plant. For a long time, I believed it would be easy to get energy from biomass, wind, and solar. Small is beautiful. Distributed power, not centralized.

I wish I could still believe that.

My thinking changed when I worked with Marty Hoffert of New York University on research that was first published in Nature in 1998. It was the first peer-reviewed study that examined the amount of near-zero-emission energy we would need in order to solve the climate problem Detail

Climate Change Conference

Climate Change is real.Let's Unite to protect this planet.